Healthy teeth and gums are important for the general health and wellbeing of our children. Bad oral health can affect our children’s sleep, ability to chew and therefore eat – and grow, to speak, to play and socialise with other children.

The public health team within your council will soon be delivering lots of services to improve the oral health of our children as we currently have the highest rate of tooth decay in our five year olds – in all of England

Sugar is the main cause of tooth decay and Change 4 Life offers useful tips on sugar swaps. Click on the image below for more fabulous helpful information and sign up for alerts

You should brush your child’s teeth at least twice a day for 2 minutes each time with adult toothpaste (contains 1450 parts per million fluoride) – a smear for toddlers and a pea sized once they start nursery – please watch this video.

Registering with a dentist

You should take your baby to the dentist when their teeth first come through or have a dental check by one at the latest. Speak to your health visitor if you need help registering with a dentist but all dental treatment is free for every child under 18 years. If you are struggling to find a new NHS service, please contact Dental Choices who list NHS dentists taking on new patients nearest to your postcode.

Free Toothbrush, Toothpaste and Sippy Cup

Your health visitor will see you and your baby again when they are between 8 and 12 months old. At this visit you will be given a free toothbrush, a tube of adult toothpaste as kids need at least 1,000 parts per million fluoride (children’s toothpaste is a gimmick) and a free flow sippy cup now they don’t need a bottle. Do please let us know what you think of this service by contacting us.

Blackburn Healthy Living Pilot

The public health team commissioned Blackburn Healthy Living to pilot an oral health project in one Mosque at a Madrassah. This video is designed for parents and has been shared on their WhatsApp groups. The intention is to do more research across further Mosques and Madrassahs to get a more robust sample for further data and analysis which will support targeted oral health interventions for our South Asian communities